Testing featured posts with videos.

Our last theme, Rank & File, received a sunny reception among bloggers looking for a professional theme. Brands like Kate Spade and GQ have used it beautifully for their presence on Tumblr. It’s been about a year since its release, and in that time we’ve heard a barrel of requests for new features and changes, but it never felt right to alter R&F too much from the original vision.
And so: Anchor. Anchor is Rank & File’s cousin, a new option for those in need of a confident, smart, flexible theme.
As pictured above, Anchor has ample support for branding: every single color is an option — this includes the icons which are actually served as a font to allow for total customization. And by just picking a tag, you can populate the “feature bar” that (optionally) runs across the top of the site with your most important posts.
For live examples of the robust customization, check out our friends at Die, Workwear! or David’s personal blog.
Pick it up today in the theme garden for the price of $49. If you have any questions, feedback, bugs, suggestions, or anything else, just send David an email: david@sleepoversf.com. 

Our last theme, Rank & File, received a sunny reception among bloggers looking for a professional theme. Brands like Kate Spade and GQ have used it beautifully for their presence on Tumblr. It’s been about a year since its release, and in that time we’ve heard a barrel of requests for new features and changes, but it never felt right to alter R&F too much from the original vision.

And so: Anchor. Anchor is Rank & File’s cousin, a new option for those in need of a confident, smart, flexible theme.

As pictured above, Anchor has ample support for branding: every single color is an option — this includes the icons which are actually served as a font to allow for total customization. And by just picking a tag, you can populate the “feature bar” that (optionally) runs across the top of the site with your most important posts.

For live examples of the robust customization, check out our friends at Die, Workwear! or David’s personal blog.

Pick it up today in the theme garden for the price of $49. If you have any questions, feedback, bugs, suggestions, or anything else, just send David an email: david@sleepoversf.com

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Swan fan Makkum on Wikipedia

The Swan fan Makkum is a Brigantine, built in 1993 in the Gdansk shipyard, Poland. Named for Willem Sligting, Makkum, christened by Hinke de Vries, co-owner and wife, in a multilingual fashion: English, Polish and Frysian and after the ceremony launched in the river Wisla. She is the largest Brigantine in the world, as well as the largest two masted sailing vessel, with an overall length of 61 metres.

She carries a maximum of 1300 square metres of sail, and with an air draft of 44 metres is one of the tallest of the tall ships. She currently operates as a charter vessel in Europe. She has crossed the Atlantic Ocean 18 times and has passaged in 2007 over 300,000 miles since she was built. She has made regular appearances at major sailing events around the world and competes in at least part of the Tall Ships Race series every year.

track On Target
artist Nullsleep
album Electric Heart Strike

Nullsleep tears the space-time continuum a new one, emerging from the 10th dimension to deliver his new 8bitpeoples release – Electric Heart Strike. Equal parts elegant data corruption and unbridled chiptune intensity, it is at once a suitable soundtrack for your next dance party or your first time surfing the superstrings to Alpha Centauri. Epic low-bit rock anthems, beat-driven juggernauts that spontaneously segfault, and romantic squarewave duets are the order of the day here. Until the future, Parity Hard!

While the majority of the clipper ships sailed under British and American flags, more than a hundred clippers were built in the Netherlands. They were medium clippers rather than the larger extreme clipper.
At an exhibition in Amsterdam in 1852 the Dutch lieutenant-commander M.H. Jansen showed a model of a medium-clipper which he obtained from the shipbuilders Perrine, Patterson & Stack of Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The shipping company of Gebr. Blussé (Dordrecht) were very impressed by this model. This resulted in the launching of the clipper Kosmopoliet (800 tons) for the company in 1854. She is said to be the first Dutch clipper.

While the majority of the clipper ships sailed under British and American flags, more than a hundred clippers were built in the Netherlands. They were medium clippers rather than the larger extreme clipper.

At an exhibition in Amsterdam in 1852 the Dutch lieutenant-commander M.H. Jansen showed a model of a medium-clipper which he obtained from the shipbuilders Perrine, Patterson & Stack of Williamsburg, Brooklyn. The shipping company of Gebr. Blussé (Dordrecht) were very impressed by this model. This resulted in the launching of the clipper Kosmopoliet (800 tons) for the company in 1854. She is said to be the first Dutch clipper.

Thus he spake, and by the advice of Argus Jason bade them enter a shaded backwater and let the ship ride at anchor off shore. And soon the dawn appeared to their expectant eyes.

Argonautica, Apollonius Rhodius.

There are two “lives” of Apollonius in the Scholia, both derived from an earlier one which is lost. From these we learn that he was of Alexandria by birth, that he lived in the time of the Ptolemies, and was a pupil of Callimachus; that while still a youth he composed and recited in public his “Argonautica”, and that the poem was condemned, in consequence of which he retired to Rhodes; that there he revised his poem, recited it with great applause, and hence called himself a Rhodian.

History of the anchor

The words ὀδὁντες and dentes (both meaning “teeth”) are frequently used to denote anchors in Greek and Latin poems. The invention of the teeth is ascribed by Pliny to the Tuscans; but Pausanias gives the credit to Midas, king of Phrygia.

Originally there was only one fluke or tooth, whence anchors were called ἑτερόστομοι; but a second was added, according to Pliny, by Eupalamus, or, according to Strabo, by Anacharsis, the Scythian philosopher. The anchors with two teeth were called ἀμϕἱβολοι or ἀμϕἱστομοι, and from ancient monuments appear to have resembled generally those used in modern days except that the stock is absent from them all.

Every ship had several anchors; the largest, corresponding to our sheet anchor, was used only in extreme danger, and was hence peculiarly termed ἱερά or sacra, whence the proverb sacram anchram solvere, as flying to the last refuge.